Netflix renews '13 Reasons Why' for second season

Netflix renews '13 Reasons Why' for second season

NEW YORK - Netflix has renewed the watercooler hit "13 Reasons Why" for a second season.
         
The streaming service announced Sunday that it has picked up the series revolving around the suicide of a high school girl. Season two will debut on Netflix next year.
         
While Netflix doesn't release ratings information, "13 Reasons Why" has proven a conversation-starting drama.
         
Some have criticized the show for glorifying suicide, which led to Netflix adding an additional warning ahead of the series.
         
The Selena Gomez-produced "13 Reasons Why" is based on Jay Asher's young adult best-seller.
         
The second season will also be 13 episodes long.

KARE 11's Adrienne Broaddus met a Minnesota mother with an important message.

Suffering in silence is what Tracy Toner believes led to her son's suicide.  She says her son, Victor hanged himself months before his high school graduation.

“He decided within a few hours that this was how he was going to fix the pain that he was in,” Toner said. “It was after an argument with a girlfriend.”

Toner said she still remembers trying to save him that Sunday night in November.

“I held his body up as high as I could while my husband climbed the tree to cut him down,” Toner said fighting tears.

Nearly 17 years later, Toner has turned her grief into healing for others.

Toner runs a support group in St. Paul to help people survive after suicide loss.

Friends and Families of Suicide is an ongoing survivors of suicide support group meeting.

The meetings are facilitated by peer-facilitators and are not a substitute for counseling or care by professionals.

The support group provides a place of support and comfort where those that have lost a loved one to suicide can be comfortable talking about their loss as well as hearing about the losses of others.

The group meets in St. Paul on  the third Monday of every month from 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. at 1725 Grand Avenue.

Toner hopes people have healthy conversation about suicide. She wants teens to know it is permanent and help is available.

“It may end immediate pain or confusion. That pain or confusion, not to minimize it, will pass,” Toner said. “The loss for those that love them, won't end.”

 

© 2017 Associated Press


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