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VILLA HILLS, Ohio -It sounds strange, but ananonymous thief is welcome anytime in the Villa Hills home of Leo and Dee Samad.

Last week, Dee found a piece of folded paper laying outside her sliding glass backdoor. It was about 8:30 or 9 in the evening. The discovery came after Dee noticed a gate was open.
The Samads own a 12-foot bar by their backyard in-ground swimming pool. Dee said for several years she and her husband havenoticed beer was missing from the backyard bar. For a period, liquor also disappeared.

After closing the gate and while on her way back into the house, Dee noticed the paper. She brought it inside her home. Inside the paper were seven $20 bills. On the paper was a one-paragraph note to "Dear Homeowner" and signed by "Villa Hills Resident."

"Enclosed is a sum of cash that my friends and I owe you and your family to repay you for all of the times we have stolen from your poolside fridge/bar over the past few years," the note said. "I speak on their behalf."

The writer said he hoped to speak to the Samads' face-to-face and man-to-man, but the potential consequences were a stronger force.

"I hope you will accept my most sincere apology for trespassing as well as feeling entitled to take what was not mine," the note said. "The amount is a rough estimate, and I realize no amount will completely satisfy the anger you may have."

The writer cited the Bible verse Romans 1:16 in the letter and asked the Samads to use the money "to bless your family with good gifts and happiness." The writer promised that neither he nor any friend wouldn't set foot ever again in the Samads' backyard.

Dee, 69, and retired, said she would like to hug the thief. She suspects the stealing started when the thief was a teenager who once probably had a drinking problem. "My husband said he would be welcomed in our home anytime just because he's man enough to stand up and do this," she said.

By going public, Dee hopes the thief knows that the Samads have no animosity toward him. There are no plans to call police.
"People need to hear good things once in a while," she said

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