SHARE 3 COMMENTMORE

A Russian human rights activist has told The Associated Press that two members of the punk band Pussy Riot were detained Tuesday near the Olympics in downtown Sochi.

Semyon Simonov told the news agency that he was with Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova at the time. He said the two women were accused of theft, and several other activists also were detained.

Tolokonnikova also sent a series of tweets over 40 minutes detailing the duo's activities. The first tweet, sent at 2:50 p.m. local time, revealed they had been detained near the seaport of Sochi on suspicion of felony. In following tweets, Tolokonnikova accused the police of using force during the arrest and wrote that at the moment of detention they had not carried out their action but rather were walking, emphasizing the walking.

About 90 minutes after tweeting that she had been detained, Tolokonnikova tweeted that she was forced to testify without a lawyer.

The duo were taken to the police station in Adler, and a series of activists detailed that journey via Twitter, posting photos of the police van carrying Alyokhina and Tolokonnikova.

She said the duo were in Sochi to carry out a Pussy Riot action - the song "Putin will teach you to love the motherland."

She later tweeted that the song is dedicated to the corrupt Olympics, ecologist Yevgeny Vitishko and suppressed freedoms in Russia. Vitishko wrote a report by the Echo Watch North Caucasus group about environmental damage caused by Olympic constrcution. He was arrested in early February and charged with swearing in public.

The 24-year-old Tolokonnikova and 25-year-old Alyokhina were released Dec. 23 following a 21-month imprisonment for a protest performance in a Moscow cathedral that led to charges of hooliganism and blasphemy.

The band's third member, Yekaterina Samutsevich, was released on suspended sentence shortly after all three women were found guilty of hooliganism and sentenced to two years in prison in August 2012.

Appearing at an Amnesty International concert in Brooklyn in early February, Tolokonnikova called for a boycott of the Sochi Olympics, ranging from not attending the event to giving it no media coverage.

"We want Americans to keep their eyes open," she said through an interpreter, "and not buy whole what (Vladimir) Putin is trying to sell them."

Asked where they intended to go after being released, Alyokhina, said they would go back to Russia: "It is our country, and we want to make it a free country."

SHARE 3 COMMENTMORE

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.