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MINNEAPOLIS - Rush hour last Friday night is blurry in hindsight for Aaron Purmort.

"The last thing I remember is driving past Taco Bell and seeing the Taco Bell lights," Purmort said of that drive home.

What happened next was a close call for a guy who might as well have that phrase for a middle name.

Three years ago Aaron was diagnosed with stage-4 brain cancer.

It was found the night he had his first seizure.

He hadn't had another one until Friday's drive home.

"I was about 3 minutes away from home and woke up in an ambulance," Aaron recalled of the night.

It defies logic that Aaron could have a seizure driving in one of the busiest areas of Northeast Minneapolis and not get hurt.

Not crash.

But he might have had help.

"If I remember right they said he, but that is the only clue I have," Aaron said referring to the person who stopped to help him that night, but a person he doesn't remember.

Someone found Aaron and called 9-1-1.

That someone stayed with him until the EMT's got there.

And that someone, then made sure to tie up the last loose end.

They moved Aaron's car, and before they left, let him know by leaving a note in his pocket with his keys.

Aaron is a father.

He's 32-years-old and he's battling cancer.

Whoever left the note didn't know that.

They just knew the fella needed some help so they moved his car and let him know.

But then Aaron and his wife Nora wanted you to know.

They posted the story and the note on Facebook.

In less than 3 days thousands of you have shared the note or liked it.

Maybe it's because you like to see simple examples of why being a good guy matters.

And maybe the next time fate calls on you you'll remember this anonymous good deed and do it one better.

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