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Cargill testing new asphalt in Minnesota

For the past five years, scientists at Cargill have been working on a new type of pavement that uses less raw materials, like aggregate and oils, and is designed to be more durable.

HOPKINS, Minn. - Our roads take a beating here in Minnesota.

Just this year we've seen temperatures as cold as 14 below, highs to 100 and an incredible April blizzard that dropped more than a foot of snow. All of these bring wear and tear to our roads.

For the past five years, scientists at Cargill have been working on a new type of pavement that uses less raw materials-- like aggregate and oils-- and is designed to be more durable.

"We are looking at increasing the recycled content of the pavement. Traditionally, pavement has 30 percent recycled content, today in the trial we are working on it will include 45 percent recycle content," said Susan Listberger, Road Construction Manager

Along with this stretch of Excelsior Blvd in Hopkins, 4.8 miles of road is being paved. One side with the traditional method, the other side, the new way.

"By using more recycled material that's less raw material that you have to bring in, you have to truck in less material. You can save money on the transportation and raw material cost," said Listberger.

How much less material? For this project, it was six fewer dump trucks and scientists at Cargill say that this road will last longer too.

"You can actually get pavement that is more durable and lasts longer and can perform better some of the conventional lower recycled pavements that are made," said Hassan Tabatabaee, Cargill scientist.

Cargill researchers expect this new recipe of blacktop to be more resistant to potholes and cracking.