Minneapolis bans drive-thrus in new businesses

The Minneapolis City Council voted unanimously to ban drive-thru windows at new businesses. Council members say the move is needed to ease traffic snarls, remove barriers and safety threats to pedestrians, reduce the size of parking lots and cut down on emissions from idling vehicles. Businesses with existing drive-thrus are exempt. The proposed ban came before the city planning council in May of 2019. At that time Executive Director of Move Minnesota Jessica Treat said other factors have become more pressing than the convenience offered by drive-thrus. Others KARE 11 talked to were not too hot on the ban. “I think that's a horrible idea, I love drive-thrus, they save a lot of time,” University of Minnesota student Hannah Brady said while exiting the McDonald’s drive-through in Dinkytown.

Jamar Clark's family accepts tentative $200K settlement from Minneapolis

Jamar Clark's family accepts tentative $200K settlement from Mpls.

The City of Minneapolis has reached a tentative $200,000 settlement with the family of Jamar Clark, a man who was shot and killed by a Minneapolis police nearly four years ago. Clark was shot in November 2015 by Minneapolis Police Officer Dustin Schwarze while Clark was struggling on the ground with Officer Mark Ringgenberg. The Hennepin County Attorney declined to charge the officers because Ringgenberg said Clark wouldn't let go of his gun and Clark's DNA was found on it. But the shooting sparked a large protest outside the Minneapolis Police Department's 4th Precinct. David Suro, the lawyer representing Jamar Clark's father, tells KARE 11 that there is an agreement between the father, James Clark, and Jamar's sisters on how the money will be shared. The settlement still needs to be approved by the city council. Suro says the family hopes some of the money will be set aside for possibly a community center with Jamar Clark's name on it.

MN declares outbreak of hepatitis A

MN declares outbreak of hepatitis A

Minnesota health officials say there's an outbreak in parts of the state of hepatitis A, a virus that can cause severe liver damage. Minnesota Health Department (MDH) Infectious Disease Director Kris Ehresmann said the outbreak includes 23 cases in nine counties. Patients in 13 of those cases have been hospitalized, and all have been discharged. The virus most commonly spreads when people eat, drink or place an object in their mouth that's contaminated with fecal matter from someone who has the virus. High-risk groups include people who use street drugs (injection or non-injection), those experiencing homelessness or unstable housing, and people who are or have recently been incarcerated. While anyone who is not vaccinated can get hepatitis A, those who are homeless or who use street drugs are at higher risk, particularly if they don’t have access to sanitation, restroom facilities and hand washing facilities. The Minnesota Department of Health is pushing for more widespread vaccination efforts in high-risk areas such as jails and homeless shelters.

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