After critical comments from former White House adviser Steve Bannon became public, President Trump said Bannon had "lost his mind."
Mandel Ngan, AFP/Getty Images

Steve Bannon called Donald Trump Jr. "treasonous" for meeting with a Russian lawyer during his father's campaign, one of many explosive claims in a new book that upended the former White House chief strategist's alliance with President Trump on Wednesday. Trump responded by claiming Bannon, his one-time campaign CEO, had "lost his mind."

Things only got more awkward from there.

And speaking of Russia: Paul Manafort, Trump's former campaign chief, is suing special counsel Robert Mueller over his indictment

Read more OP and subscribe here.

Bannon rips Trump's kids in this new book

Bannon spoke to journalist Michael Wolff for his forthcoming book, Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, criticizing Don Jr. for meeting with a Russian lawyer who offered dirt on Hillary Clinton during the 2016 campaign: "The three senior guys in the campaign thought it was a good idea to meet with a foreign government inside Trump Tower in the conference room on the 25th floor – with no lawyers. They didn’t have any lawyers."

Bannon, now the chief of Breitbart News, continued:  “Even if you thought that this was not treasonous, or unpatriotic, or bad s***, and I happen to think it’s all of that, you should have called the FBI immediately.”

He also calls Ivanka Trump "dumb as a brick" in the book. But wait, there's more: Read the highlights here.

Trump's furious response to Bannon

"Steve Bannon has nothing to do with me or my Presidency," Trump said Wednesday in a scathing statement. "When he was fired, he not only lost his job, he lost his mind."

Bannon had "very little to do" with the Trump campaign's win, Trump said, and he spent his time as an adviser "leaking false information to the media to make himself seem far more important than he was."

"It is the only thing he does well," Trump said.

We're guessing this whole Bannon-Trump alliance is basically over. Mitch McConnell's team, however, seems to be loving it.

Trump can't prove 3 million people voted illegally, so he's disbanding his panel

Trump announced an election fraud commission last May, claiming (falsely) that three million people voted illegally in last year's presidential election — all for Hillary Clinton. But he still can't prove it, and so, citing difficulty gathering voter data,Trump will dissolve that commission less than a year later.

Elsewhere in politics