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Minnesota AG reminds voters of their in-person rights

Anyone who experiences voter interference or intimidation while voting or attempting to vote is encouraged to report it to the Minnesota Secretary of State’s office.

ST PAUL, Minn. — Tuesday is election day, and Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison is reminding voters of their rights.

In a Tuesday morning press conference, Minnesota election officials promised a "non-eventful" election. 

Officials are not expecting long lines in the city, since more than 61% of voters have already cast a ballot. If turnout is larger than anticipated, city leaders are confident that they have enough resources in place for everyone to cast a vote in a timely fashion. 

Ellison released guidance one week ago outlining federal and state laws that protect voters from interference or intimidation, officials said.

Anyone who experiences voter interference or intimidation while voting or attempting to vote is encouraged to report it to the Minnesota Secretary of State’s office at 877-600-VOTE. 

"Minnesota and federal law are clear: It is strictly illegal to intimidate or interfere with voters," Ellison said.  “As Attorney General, I do not expect to have to enforce these laws. But I will not hesitate to enforce them to the fullest extent if necessary to protect Minnesotans’ right to vote.”  

Everyone in line at their polling place by 8 p.m. will be allowed to cast a ballot. 

The following is an outline of protections you have as a voter, according to Ellison's office:

  • No one may prevent you from voting or registering to vote. 
  • No one may force you to vote for or against someone.  
  • No one may interfere with you when you go to vote. 
  • Only voters are allowed within 100 feet of polling places, with limited exceptions. So-called “poll watchers” are not allowed within 100 feet of polling places. 
  • No one may harass or intimidate you more than 100 feet from a polling place. 
  • No one may interfere with you while you cast your ballot. 
  • Challengers designated by political parties are allowed in polling places; however, they are subject to restrictions, and may not harass or intimidate you or attempt to influence voting in any manner. 
  • Law enforcement may not interfere with your right to vote. 
  • The President may not order agents of the federal government to polling places. Agents of the federal government may not interfere with your right to vote. 
  • The President may not order military to polling places. Military may not interfere with your right to vote. 
  • Private armed forces are illegal in Minnesota and may not interfere with your right to vote. 

See a problem at the polls? After you report it to the Secretary of State's Office, text it to us at 763-797-7215.