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Which ID number should I use on my absentee ballot?

You have to use the same number you used on your ballot application. But what if you don't remember what that is?

Once you finish filling out your absentee ballot, there are a few more steps to take to ensure your vote is counted.

You put it in the yellow envelope, then the white envelope - and then you fill out the white envelope. That includes printing either your Minnesota driver's license number, Minnesota ID card number, or the last four digits of your Social Security number.

Trick is, the instructions say you have to use the same number you used when filling out your absentee ballot application.

What if you don't remember which document number you used?

Risikat Adesaogun, deputy communications director for the Minnesota Secretary of State's Office, said not to worry. You can put multiple numbers down if you're not sure which one you used originally.

Adesaogun said more information just means there's another way to match the voter's information.

However, there is one trick you can use to figure out which number you used originally. Go to the Secretary of State's ballot tracker tool online. Try one of the numbers to look up your ballot. If it works, that means that number is in your file, and you can use it on your absentee ballot.

If you originally used multiple numbers to request your ballot, any of the ones you used will work.

Finally, Adesaogun said that if you use the wrong number on your absentee ballot, it is not automatically rejected. The ballot board will first compare the signature on your application to the signature on your ballot. If they agree that the signatures match, the ballot can be accepted.

If you applied for your ballot online and didn't submit a signature, the board will also try looking up the ID number you used on your final ballot in their voter records database (SVRS). If the ID number you used on the ballot exists as part of your voter information, they can accept it - even if you didn't use it on the original application.

If you haven't submitted your absentee ballot yet, NBC News reporter Geoff Bennett reports that existing delays in USPS delivery suggest you should drop it off in person instead of relying on the mail. For more information on how to submit that ballot in person, check out the KARE 11 voting guide.