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Live updates: MDH reports 21 deaths and 1,684 new cases

Here are the latest COVID-19 developments in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

ST PAUL, Minn. — Sunday Oct. 25

2 p.m.

Wisconsin's Department of Health Services (WDHS) reported 3,626 new cases on Sunday, bringing the total number of confirmed cases statewide to 198,166. 

Health officials reported eight new deaths on Sunday as the total number of fatalities statewide rises to 1,778. The total number of fatalities is approximately 0.9% of those testing positive for the virus. 

Wisconsin health officials say a total of 10,332 people have been hospitalized from the coronavirus since the start of the pandemic, about 5.2% of the total number of people who have been diagnosed with the virus. 

Of the confirmed cases in Wisconsin, 22% involve people between the ages of 20 to 29, 15% are between 30 and 39, 15% are between 50 and 59, and 14% are 40 to 49. An estimated 12% are between 10 and 19, and 10% are between 60 and 69.

As of Sunday, Milwaukee County reported the largest number of cases with 38,960 along with 569 deaths. Brown County has reported 14,580 cases and 89 deaths, and Dane County has reported 14,126 cases and 48 deaths.

11 a.m.

The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) announced Sunday that the number of positive coronavirus (COVID-19) cases in Minnesota has increased by 1,684 bringing the cumulative total to 133,802.

Twenty-one more people have died, bringing the death total to 2,349.

MDH also said Sunday that the total number of tests taken is at 2,686,302.

MDH's COVID-19 case definition was recently updated to include antigen testing. Previously, cases were only reported through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Positive PCR test results are considered confirmed cases, while positive antigen test results are considered probable cases. 

MDH will combine these totals for its death, hospitalization and demographic reporting. The department will report the numbers separately for some other areas, like newly reported cases and total cases by county of residence. 

To date, 9,511 Minnesotans have been hospitalized with the coronavirus since the pandemic started, with 2,538 of them needing care in the ICU.

MDH reports that 118,485 people once diagnosed with the virus have recovered enough that they no longer need isolation.

Of those who have tested positive, people between the ages of 20-24 account for the most cases with 16,812 cases and one death, and ages 25-29 follow with  
13,011 cases and three deaths. Those between 85 and 89 years old account for the highest number of fatalities in one age group at 411 out of 1,797 confirmed cases.

In terms of likely exposure to the coronavirus, MDH says 34,502 cases were the result of community transmission with no known contact with an infected person, and 30,259 had known contact with a person who has a confirmed case.

A total of 14,602 cases involved exposure in a congregate living setting, 2,504 were in a corrections setting, and 391 were in a homeless shelter. MDH data shows 10,638 were linked to an outbreak outside of congregate living or health care.

MDH says 12,238 cases were linked to travel. Health care workers or patients account for 4,409 of diagnosed COVID-19 cases. The source of transmission for 24,259 cases is still unknown or missing.

MDH has prioritized testing for people in congregate care, hospitalized patients and health care workers, which may impact the scale of those numbers. However, now MDH is urging anyone who is symptomatic to be tested. Testing locations can be found online.

Hennepin County has the most cases in the state at 33,964 cases with 991 deaths, followed by Ramsey County with 13,992 cases and 360 deaths. Dakota County reports 9,799 cases and 138 deaths.

Full data, including a breakdown of PCR and antigen test totals in some categories, can be found on MDH's website.

Saturday, Oct. 24

2 p.m.

Wisconsin's Department of Health Services (WDHS) reported 4,062 new cases on Saturday, bringing the total number of confirmed cases statewide to 194,540. 

Health officials reported 25 new deaths on Saturday as the total number of fatalities statewide rises to 1,770. The total number of fatalities is approximately 0.9% of those testing positive for the virus.  

Due to high case numbers, Gov. Tony Evers issued an emergency order mandating indoor face coverings that began at 12:01 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 1. On Tuesday, Sept. 22, Evers extended the mask mandate until Nov. 21.

On Tuesday, Oct. 6 Gov. Evers' administration issued a new order limiting the size of public indoor gatherings to 25% of capacity, to stem the spread of COVID-19. That order was struck down on Oct. 13 by a judge in Sawyer County but then reinstated on Oct. 19 by a Barron County judge.

Wisconsin health officials say a total of 10,237 people have been hospitalized from the coronavirus since the start of the pandemic, about 5.3% of the total number of people who have been diagnosed with the virus. 

Of the confirmed cases in Wisconsin, 22% involve people between the ages of 20 to 29, 15% are between 30 and 39, 15% are between 50 and 59, and 14% are 40 to 49. An estimated 12% are between 10 and 19, and 10% are between 60 and 69.

As of Saturday, Milwaukee County reported the largest number of cases with 38,108 along with 567 deaths. Brown County has reported 14,433 cases and 89 deaths, and Dane County has reported 13,831 cases and 48 deaths.

A more detailed breakdown of cases by county can be found on the DHS website.

11 a.m.

The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) reported 2,268 additional COVID-19 cases Saturday. 

MDH's COVID-19 case definition was recently updated to include antigen testing. Previously, cases were only reported through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Positive PCR test results are considered confirmed cases, while positive antigen test results are considered probable cases. 

MDH will combine these totals for its death, hospitalization and demographic reporting. The department will report the numbers separately for some other areas, like newly reported cases and total cases by county of residence. 

The total number of Minnesotans who have tested positive for the virus since the pandemic began is 131,753, and 369 of them were antigen test results. 

MDH says 14 new deaths from the virus were reported in the past day, pushing the total number of fatalities in the Minnesota to 2,328.

To date, 9,444 Minnesotans have been hospitalized with the coronavirus since the pandemic started, with 2,533 of them needing care in the ICU.

MDH reports that 116,693 people once diagnosed with the virus have recovered enough that they no longer need isolation.

Of those who have tested positive, people between the ages of 20-24 account for the most cases with 16,646 cases and one death, and ages 25-29 follow with  
12,875 cases and three deaths. Those between 85 and 89 years old account for the highest number of fatalities in one age group at 407 out of 1,774 confirmed cases.

Hennepin County has the most cases in the state at 33,719 cases with 984 deaths, followed by Ramsey County with 13,909 cases and 358 deaths. Dakota County reports 9,686 cases and 137 deaths.

Full data, including a breakdown of PCR and antigen test totals in some categories, can be found on MDH's website.

Friday, Oct. 23

  • Anoka-Champlin Park prep football game canceled due to COVID investigation
  • 1,721 cases Friday continues upward trend, 565 people currently hospitalized across the state
  • 42% increase in Minnesotans getting flu shots at this point in season
  • While vaccines are not yet available, MDH is working on a distribution plan
  • Officials worry 'COVID fatigue' playing into spike in cases

2 p.m.

Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) Commissioner Jan Malcolm says hospitalizations in the state are climbing.

As of Friday, there are 565 people hospitalized due to COVID-19 across the state, with 160 of them in the ICU.

“This is not as high as we saw in May but we are approaching the same number of hospitalizations as we saw earlier in the pandemic,” Malcolm said Friday on a regular briefing call with members of the media.

The recent increase in test positivity and the gap between case growth and testing growth shows that there are “very high levels” of transmission across the state, Malcolm added.

Dr. Tai Mendenhall of the University of Minnesota Medical Reserve Corps joined the Friday briefing to talk about the mental health stressors on Minnesotans that may increase this upcoming winter.

This winter, he said, any normal sickness will be connected to a worry about “Do I have COVID?” and maybe even “Am I going to die?”

Mendenhall pointed out that people are losing some ways of coping this winter, for instance outdoor exercise. He said the holidays are bringing extra stress as well.

Mendenhall offered three suggestions to Minnesotans who are struggling this fall and winter:

  • Recognize and give yourself grace around mental health and mental illness. “What it means is that you’re human,” he said. Remember that stress and anxiety are not character flaws. “We can address and think about and honor the humanness of mental health.”
  • If you are hurting, reach out and seek help. TherapistLocator.com and Psychology Today have resources for finding local therapists. Help doesn’t have to come from a doctor, though. Build community with things like weekly family or friend Zoom calls.
  • Remind yourself that there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Personalize what you need for you. Diet, exercise, seeing a doctor or therapist, meditation, books, apps, quality time with spouse or kids, can all work for different people going through different situations. Mendenhall said sometimes people need to go to a spiritual or faith resource. “We’re going to be better able to navigate where we’re hurting” without searching for a silver bullet, Mendenhall said.

Malcolm added that MDH is providing a free mental health hotline at 833-437-3466, in collaboration with several other organizations.

Dr. Ruth Lynfield, MDH’s state epidemiologist, said to date 28 Minnesota children have been confirmed as having MIS-C, or Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children.

“This is a severe syndrome in children that is thought to be associated with SARS-CoV-2,” Lynfield said.

Eighty-eight percent had antibodies that indicated COVID-19, and the rest had been exposed to COVID-19, Lynfield said. Fifty-seven percent required intensive care.

All had fever, more than 80% had gastrointestinal symptoms and more than 70% had evidence of heart involvement.

“Fortunately all of these children are now home and we have not had any deaths,” Lynfield said.

The age range of Minnesota’s cases is 6 months to 16 years. Black and Hispanic children have been disproportionately affected, making up approximately 75% of cases, Lynfield said.

Although it’s rare, Lynfield said, any symptoms should be taken seriously because there is a “high rate of critical illness.”

11 a.m.

New cases of COVID-19 continue their upward trend, according to numbers released Friday by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH). 

Health officials say 1,721 new cases of the virus were reported in the last day, bringing the state total to 129,863 since the pandemic began. The new cases were confirmed by the results of 26,742 tests (a combination of PCR and Antigen) processed in private and state labs. 

Another 13 people have lost their lives to coronavirus, bringing Minnesota's total of fatalities to 2,314. Of those deaths 1,623, or 70%, occurred in long-term care or assisted living settings. 

Credit: KARE

The running total of hospitalizations in Minnesota due to the virus now stands at 9,338 since the pandemic began, with 2,510 of those patients requiring care in the ICU. MDH says 114,679 people who at one time tested positive for COVID-19 have recovered to the point they no longer require isolation. 

People between 20 and 24 remain the largest group of Minnesota's COVID cases by a large margin with 16,429, and one fatality. Those from 25 to 29 comprise 12,611 cases and three deaths, while 15 to 19-year-olds number 11,769 cases and zero deaths.

The largest grouping of fatalities involves those from 85 to 89, with 402 deaths in just 1,754 cases. That means 23% of people from this demographic who are diagnosed with coronavirus die from it. 

Hennepin County continues to report the most COVID activity in the state with 33,310 cases and 981 deaths, while Ramsey County has recorded 13,782 cases and 357 fatalities. Dakota County has 9,541 cases and 137 deaths. 

Cook County in northeastern Minnesota has the least COVID activity with only 12 cases and no fatalities since the beginning of the pandemic, while Kittson County reports 38 cases. 

Thursday, Oct. 22

11 a.m.

Minnesota health officials are reporting another day of over 1,000 new COVID-19 cases, a trend that continues to cause worry with state policy makers. 

The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) says 1,574 people tested positive over the past day, bringing the total number of cases in the state to 128,152 since the pandemic began. That number is confirmed through a combination of PCR and Antigen tests. 

An additional 20 people have died of coronavirus, bringing state fatalities to 2,301. Of those deaths 1,621, or 70% have occurred in long-term or assisted living settings.

Credit: KARE

MDH says 113,976 people who at one time tested positive for the virus have recovered to the point they no longer require isolation. 

Hospitalizations across the state now total 9,226 since COVID-19 arrived in Minnesota, with 2,485 of those patients needing care in the ICU. 

Those between the ages of 20 and 24 account for Minnesota's largest group of COVID cases with 16,285 and one fatality. People from 25 to 29 make up 12,451 cases and three fatalities, while the age group from 15 to 19 makes up 11,641 cases and zero deaths. 

MDH says people between 85 and 89 account for the largest number of COVID-19 deaths in a single age group, with 399 in just 1,734 confirmed cases.

Hennepin County has the most COVID activity, reporting 33,024 confirmed cases and 980 deaths. Ramsey County has 13,609 confirmed cases and 355 deaths, while Dakota County reports 9,467 cases, 136 of them fatal. 

Cook County in northeastern Minnesota has the least COVID activity with 11 cases and zero deaths, while Kittson County in far northwest Minnesota reports just 37 cases.

KARE 11’s coverage of the coronavirus is rooted in Facts, not Fear. Visit kare11.com/coronavirus for comprehensive coverage, find out what you need to know about the Midwest specifically, learn more about the symptoms, and see what businesses are open as the state slowly lifts restrictions. Have a question? Text it to us at 763-797-7215. And get the latest coronavirus updates sent right to your inbox every morning. Subscribe to the KARE 11 Sunrise newsletter here. Help local families in need: www.kare11.com/give11

The state of Minnesota has set up a data portal online at mn.gov/covid19.